Bill 66: What You Need to Know


This is a handy handout from Ontario Nature:

    1. It affects every municipality in Ontario. Bill 66 allows municipalities across the province to create “open-for-business by-laws” that would trump critical legal requirements to protect water, natural heritage, farmland and human health and well-being. These by-laws would take precedence over municipal official plans.

    2. It threatens drinking water across Ontario. Open-for-business by-laws would override policies in approved source protection plans intended to protect existing and future sources of municipal drinking water from threats such as landfills, sewage systems and improper handling of fuel, manure and pesticides.

    3. It threatens wetlands, woodlands and habitat for species at risk across Ontario. Open-for-business by-laws would circumvent protections for these important habitats and species set out in the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) under the Planning Act.

    4. It threatens farmland across Ontario. Open-for-business by-laws would bypass agricultural protections set out, for example, in the PPS. This could lead to more urban sprawl.

    5. It threatens two million acres of natural areas and farmland across the Greenbelt. Open-for-business by-laws would override protections for natural heritage and farmland set out in the Greenbelt Plan and the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan.

    6. It threatens fresh water and the ecological health of the Lake Simcoe watershed. Open-for-business bylaws would trump requirements set out in the Lake Simcoe Protection Plan.

    7. It would undermine efforts to make Ontario communities more livable, sustainable and resilient. Open-for-business by-laws would override PPS policies supporting active transportation, affordable housing, green infrastructure and climate resiliency.

    8. It would compromise transparency and public engagement. Contrary to current legal requirements (Planning Act, Clean Water Act), the by-laws could be passed without any prior public notice, behind closed doors.

    9. It would leave citizens without recourse. Community members would not be able to appeal open-for-business by-laws to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal.

    10. It threatens human and wildlife health through increased exposure to toxic chemicals. Bill 66 proposes to repeal the Toxics Reduction Act, which requires certain industrial facilities to consider ways to reduce the use and emission of toxic chemicals in their operations.

With your help, we can stop Bill 66.

Sign Today:
ontarionature.good.do/schedule10
#StopBill66


Please take two minutes to send a message to the Ontario Government to stop Bill 66:

COMMENT ON Omnibus Bill 66 HERE

DEADLINE SUNDAY: January 20th, 2019

Bill 66 Community Group Meeting

This is not a WR Greens event, but may be of interest to environmentally conscientious members.

From Kevin Thomason of GREN:

Happy New Year!

While the holidays have been a wonderful break from Bill 66, we don’t have much time to send a strong, clear message to Premier Ford about our concerns this Bill could have on our community, farmland, green space, and natural resources.

I’d like to remind you of the upcoming meeting this Thursday at the same room at CIGI as our initial community meeting. Details are as follows:

Date: Thursday, January 3, 2019
Time: 7:00pm
Location: Room A142, CIGI – Centre for International Governance and Innovation – 67 Erb Street West, Waterloo Map
Access: Through main West doors (facing Erb St) near Caroline St. Intersection

A tentative agenda for the meeting is as follows:

  • update/status of groups working to book Council delegation appearances at municipal and regional councils
  • update/status of groups working to book MPP meetings in local ridings
  • time for groups to meet in breakout sessions and figure out next steps/activities
  • planning/discussion of January 12th Bill 66 training event/protest in Ajax
  • planning/preparations for January 15th event at Kitchener City Hall with ECO Dianne Saxe and other speakers
  • other business

We had a tremendous turnout at our initial meeting and It will be important to have at least one delegate from each community group at this next meeting to help ensure a strong, co-ordinated response to Bill 66.

Please share any questions or ideas and I hope to see you on Thursday evening.

Cheers,
Kevin.

P.S. There is a draft Citizens Toolkit for Bill 66 that is coming together as groups across the province aggregate their materials and efforts. It is evolving daily and contains some good background and supporting material against Bill 66.

P.P.S Also attached below are some initial social media images and video that are under development provincially:

Bill 66 Social Media Video:


YouTube: Save The Greenbelt – Stop Bill 66

————————————-

Kevin Thomason
Vice-Chair, Grand River Environmental Network

Phone: +1–519–888–0519
Mobile Phone/WhatsApp: +1–519–240–1648
Twitter: @kthomason
E-mail: kevinthomason@mac.com

Christmas Dinner Plans

Even if Mr Ford hadn’t decided to put a stop to the $15 dollar minimum wage, it wouldn’t have raised minimum wage earners above the Low Income Cutoff (LICO) for Waterloo Region. Although we’re told we ‘recovered’ from the recession of 2008, Canadians earning minimum wage nearly doubled (from 6% – 10%) between 2017 and 2018.  Minimum wage jobs don’t just have low pay, very often they are for precarious work.

Although Waterloo Region is a rich community, many members of our community are financially strained during the holiday season.  (And for the rest of the year, too.)

MYTH: Poverty is not an issue in Waterloo Region. More than 1 in 10 people in Waterloo Region live in poverty. REALITY: Although Waterloo Region is a great place to work, live and play, poverty is an issue in our community. In 2006, approximately 10.2 per cent of residents (48,000 people) in Waterloo Region were living with low income. Imagine - you could fill the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium seven times with this many people! Did you know... • 12.2% or 13,750 children 0 to 17 years in Waterloo Region are living in low income.2 • 451,411 meals were served in 2011 through meal programs throughout Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo.3 • In May 2013, there were 8,727 cases on the Ontario Works (OW) caseload. This is a 39% increase in the caseload from September 2008.
2013 Poverty Myth Busters for Waterloo Region (page 3)
Download the PDF

That’s why the Green Party supports raising the minimum wage to a living wage, and implementing a Guaranteed Livable Income (universal basic income set at 10% above LICO).    You can find out more about Basic Income from our friends at Basic Income Waterloo.

Unfortunately that’s not going to happen until we start electing more Greens.  In the meantime, people are living in poverty and Christmas is coming.


UPDATE: We’ve added new pages (in the Resources section of the top menu):


The following is a list of free Waterloo Region Christmas Dinner options for people in need.  If you (or anyone you know) is in need of a good dinner over the holidays, please share.  (And if you’re able I imagine these organizations would welcome volunteers.)

I’m not sure who originated this list (I received as a paper handout), but most of the dinner locations listed here are for the City of Kitchener.  If you know of any others in the rest of the region– Cambridge, Waterloo or the Townships, please share and I’ll add them to the list.

Friday December 14th, 2018

Trinity United Church – Christmas Dinner Community Can Dine – Elmira, Ontario
6:00pm-7:30pm
21 Arthur St. N., Elmira Ontario

Saturday, December 15th, 2018

Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church – Regular Saturday Supper
open 5:00pm-8:00pm – Supper served 5:30-7:30pm
57 Stirling Avenue North, Kitchener

Sunday, December 16th, 2018

KCI Christmas Dinner
10:45am – 1:30pm

787 King Street W., Kitchener (enter off King Street)
Tickets available at St. John’s Kitchen or St Mark’s Church
(Limited tickets available last week of November and first week of December)

Thursday December 20th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Friday December 21st, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Regular Hours
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Saturday December 22nd, 2018

Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church – Regular Saturday Supper – open 5:00pm-8:00pm
Supper served 5:30-7:30pm
57 Stirling Avenue North, Kitchener

Sunday December 23rd, 2018

Caper’s Sports Bar – Christmas Dinner
Noon – 3:00pm
1 Queen Street North, Kitchener
*Toy and Clothing giveaway

Monday December 24th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
Meal by St Vincent de Paul
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Ray of Hope – Festive Dinner
7:00pm-8:30pm
659 King Street East, (Back Door) Kitchener

Tuesday December 25th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Christmas Dinner by Friends of St John’s Kitchen
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Ray of Hope – Regular Dinner
7:00pm-8:30pm
659 King Street East, (Back Door) Kitchener

Wednesday, December 26th, 2018

First United Church Christmas Buffet
11:30am-1pm
16 William Street, Waterloo

Thursday, December 27th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Friday, December 28th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Saturday, December 29th, 2018

Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church – Regular Saturday Supper
open 5:00pm-8:00pm – Supper served 5:30-7:30pm
57 Stirling Avenue North, Kitchener

Sunday December 30th, 2018

Ray of Hope – Lunch
Noon-1:30pm
659 King Street East, (Back Door) Kitchener

Monday, December 31, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Regular Hours
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Tuesday, January 1st, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen CLOSED

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Regular Hours
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

The UN’s 1.5°C special climate report at a glance

[Guest Post by Emil Jeyaratnam, Madeleine De Gabriele, and Michael Hopkin, originally published in The Conversation]

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a special report today on the impacts of global warming of 1.5℃ above pre-industrial levels.

The report outlines the considerable challenges of meeting the Paris Agreement’s more ambitious goal of limiting warming to 1.5℃, the global effort needed to achieve the target, and the consequences of not.

The highlights of the report are presented below:


infographic Graph: TITLE Global warming projections for 2100 | Emissions and expected warming based in pledges and current policies | Y-Axis Global greenhouse gas emmissions GtCO2e/year | 150 - Warming projected by 2100 | 100 - Baseline 4.1 - 4.8°C | 50 - Current policies 3.1 - 3.7°C | - Pledges 2.6 - 3.2°C | 0 - 2°C consistent 1.5 - 1.7°C | -50 - 1.5°C consistent 1.3 - 1.5°C -50 | X-Axis 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060 2070 2080 2090 2100 | source: Climate Action Tracker | Text: The world will need ti be carbon-neutral by 2047 to give us a 66% chance of hitting the 1.5°C target, or by 2058 for a 50% chance. If the world was carbon neutral by: • 2047: we have a 66% chance of limiting warming to 1.5°C •2058: we have a 50% chance of limiting waeming to 1.5°C This will mean • sourcing 70 - 86% of electricity from renewables by 2050 • putting a price on greenhouse emissions • using technology to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. GRAPH: Renewable energy targets | Proportion of global renewable energy consumption in 2015* = 18% | Global Target by 2050: 70 - 85% of electricity supplied by renewables | Australia: Australia's target for 2020: 23% | Labor's Target for 2030: 50% | souce: The World Bank | Text: The world has had about 1°C of warming so far. at 1.5°C we will see: • more heatwaves, floods and droughts • up to 90% of reef corals lost • damage to crops and fisheries • threats to economic growth | images: forest fire, flooded settlement, dead coral, dustbowl farmer's field | Text: But by avoiding 2°C of global warming, we will: • protect 10.4m people from sea level rise • halve the number of people without fresh water • reduce death and disease from heatwaves. • make it easier to deliver many of the UN's Sustainable Development GoalsCC BY-ND


Correction: A previous version of this article stated that the Australian Labor Party had a goal of reaching 50% renewable energy by 2050. But the ALP hope to achieve the 50% target via an emissions intensity scheme by 2030.

Emil Jeyaratnam, Multimedia Editor, The Conversation;
Madeleine De Gabriele, Deputy Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation, and
Michael Hopkin, Section Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 4.0 License. Read the original article.

Find the ipcc (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report Global Warming of 1.5 °C ~ an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty

“Global Greenhouse Gas Emmission Trajectories” graphic by Laurel L. Russwurm based on “The UN’s 1.5°C special climate report at a glance” released under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 4.0 License

Stranded Assets

[Guest Post by Michael Nabert]

With fossil fuel assets already becoming stranded, Canada’s current level of dependence on fossil fuels could cost us 20% of national GDP and 8% of employment by 2030. Spending public money on a pipeline is not a smart investment, it’s a bet on a dying horse. https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2018/06/08/Canada-Buys-Pipeline-Oil-Bubble-About-To-Burst/

Don’t take my word for it. Here’s the complete peer reviewed scientific study of the macroeconomic effects in the prestigious scientific journal Nature. Up to $4 trillion in global oil investments will evaporate as the world transitions to a low carbon future. The idea that there’s a market for this poor quality product is pure fiction. Bitumen is particularly vulnerable to major shifts in the oil and gas market because production is expensive when compared to extraction techniques used in the Middle East. That means bitumen markets will be the first to collapse when demand slows significantly, making Canada particularly vulnerable. Throwing more good money away on the bitumen market at this time is climate denial as economic policy and flies in the face of what is already happening in global markets where we can all see it. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0182-1.epdf

If a drop in the value of major coal companies by well over 95% in only five years isn’t an indicator of a change in fossil fuel’s fortunes, I don’t know what is. http://rhg.com/notes/the-hidden-cause-of-americas-coal-collapse

“By 2020, the IMO has mandated that the commercial fleets it represents can only buy and burn ship engine oil with a sulphur content of 0.5%. That is a 700% reduction from the current average. It has been estimated that the 15 largest ocean vessels currently emit as much sulphur annually as all of the world’s cars.

Alberta bitumen will likely be a big loser, because it contains on average some 11 times more sulphur than conventional crude, and results in a high ratio of low-grade Bunker C when refined. As of 2020, according to industry reports, U.S. refinery purchases of diluted bitumen for ship fuel will begin slowing to an eventual trickle, Europe will buy none because it has the wrong refinery profile, and Asian refiners will dedicate new refineries to produce low-sulphur diesel for ship fuel.”

http://theenergymix.com/2018/05/24/exclusive-new-ship-fuel-rules-could-sink-tar-sands-oil-sands-expansion/

France, India, Britain, and Norway have already announced their intentions to eliminate fossil fuelled cars altogether, and other nations are moving to follow suit. http://money.cnn.com/2017/07/26/autos/countries-that-are-banning-gas-cars-for-electric/index.html

Here’s China doing the same. It’s like it’s a growing trend or something.
https://www.theverge.com/2017/9/10/16284866/china-ban-fossil-fuel-cars

Electric vehicles alone could displace oil demand of 2 million barrels a day as early as 2023, creating a global a glut of oil equivalent to what triggered the 2014 oil crisis, and that’s just one example.

https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-ev-oil-crisis/

The claim that additional pipeline capacity to tidewater will unlock significantly higher prices for bitumen is not corroborated by either past or current market conditions. Recent international commitments to reduce global carbon emissions over the next three decades will significantly reduce the size of future oil markets. Only the lowest-cost producers will remain commercially viable while high-cost producers will be forced to exit the market.

https://www.cigionline.org/publications/evaluating-need-pipelines-false-narrative-canadian-economy

All of this just to give a Texas corporation a 637% profit margin at Canadian taxpayer expense.

http://ieefa.org/ieefa-report-canadas-folly-could-drive-national-budget-deficit-36-higher-while-ensuring-houston-based-kinder-morgan-a-637-gain/

Meanwhile, clean energy is currently the best job creation engine in the whole planetary economy.

http://fortune.com/2017/01/27/solar-wind-renewable-jobs/

Canadians get exactly one opportunity to play a leadership role in the growing economy of the future. If we decide not to step up, we will be left in its dust. Fossil industries cannot sustain us in a world that is moving away from the use of fossil energies. They’re yesterday, not our tomorrow.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/act-now-or-forever-play-global-catch-up-on-clean-technology-report-1.3843825

In fact, the health care savings alone from shifting away from fossil fuels more than makes the transition to renewable energy pay for itself, not to mention that it also means saving lives. Again, you don’t have to take my word for it, so here’s another full scientific study published in a peer reviewed journal for you to read in full if you’re curious.

Download PDF https://www.nature.com/articles/nenergy2017134.epdf

Or if you don’t want to read the whole thing and would like a summary,

https://qz.com/1054992/renewable-subsidies-are-already-paying-for-themselves/

The Canadian Medical Association report that links air pollution from fossil fuels to a staggering 92,000 emergency room visits a year is just one of the troubling facts about how air quality is affecting our health, and our health care costs.

http://healthydebate.ca/2015/11/topic/air-pollution-health-alberta-ontario

Canadians will see a long list of benefits by transitioning to renewable energy. Research indicates it will create 200,000 new jobs in the energy sector and the conversion of 500,000 fossil fuel-related jobs into clean energy jobs. Air pollution from burning fossil fuels would be eliminated, energy prices would stabilize, and the country would save more than $100 billion every year.

https://www.conservationcouncil.ca/stanford-group-charts-path-for-canadas-renewable-transition/

On the other hand, no amount of wishful thinking is going to help a new pipeline turn stranded assets into economic opportunity for the future. The argument that a new pipeline is a smart investment is total bunk.

As the fossil fuel bubble bursts, lower quality assets will become stranded first. The 4 biggest coal companies, for example, have already lost 95% of their value in only 5 years. Bitumen, the most expensive form of oil to extract, requiring the most extensive refining process to produce the dirtiest final product, is up next.

Pardon Canadians Convicted for Possessing Marijuana!

Cannabis should never have been made illegal, but since it was, the Green Party supports good public policy to rectify the mistakes of the past.

GPO Leader Mike Schreiner talks about Cannabis in Kitchener

The Green Party is pleased that Canadians will soon be able to access marijuana openly and safely — free from the threat of being criminally charged.

However, many thousands of Canadians who previously smoked or possessed cannabis, but were caught by police, will remain criminals in the eyes of the law. A disproportionate number of racialized Canadians have been charged, and all those convicted face serious obstacles applying for jobs and travelling abroad.

Join us in demanding the Liberal government provide amnesty for all Canadians convicted solely on charges of marijuana possession.

click to send a letter to Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Wilson-Raybould

No Pipelines, Please #StopKM

If Canada is to be a Climate Leader, we need to reduce our fossil fuel production, not triple it.  #KeepItInTheGround

When Texas-based Kinder Morgan threatened to walk away from their disastrous pipeline and tanker project, the Trudeau government jumped in to buy them out with $4.5 billion of taxpayer dollars.

Canada is being sold a lemon by a bunch of billionaires from Texas, who are laughing all the way to the bank. Instead of investing in renewable energy, clean water for Indigenous peoples, and strong social programs, we’re buying a failing and risky dirty oil project.

Tell Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Bill Morneau to cancel the buyout of Trans Mountain now!

click to send a letter to PM Justin Trudeau & Minister Bill Morneau

Elizabeth May’s midterm report for the Trudeau Administration

Unsurprisingly the big one was Mr Trudeau’s badly broken Electoral Reform promise.

Democratic deficit, the failure to restore protections to “navigable waters,” Environment policy direction, Climate Change policy, failure to live up to Reconciliation, ignoring evidence given by experts and citizens to Parliamentary Committees and National Consultations… there is much need for improvement.

“…the intangibles are re-engaging Canadians in having faith and hope and trust in a government — if you squander that you encourage cynicism and you hurt democracy in a fundamental way.”

— Elizabeth May

The Monopolization of Marijuana

A few decades ago this classic ad was part of “The War on Drugs”

Recently the same actress, Rachael Leigh Cook, reprised her role in this 2017 “Your Brain on Drug Policy” video.

 

The war on drugs is rooted in racist policies, and it’s failure has been as obvious as Prohibition.

During the 2015 election, the NDP talked about decriminalizing cannabis, but the Liberals said that wasn’t good enough; they would take a step further and legalize it.

Sadly voters again gave too much First Past The Post power to one of the same old parties promising “real change”. For real change, you have to vote smart– and different. The Green Party has better policy:

4.9 Ending the war on drugs

Elizabeth May, Green Party of Canada Leader
Elizabeth May

Between 2008 and 2011, according to the Department of Justice, Canada spent $311 million targeting illicit drugs, with a majority of that money going to law enforcement. Most of that was for the ‘war’ against cannabis (marijuana). Marijuana prohibition is also prohibitively costly in other ways, including criminalizing youth and fostering organized crime. Cannabis prohibition, which has gone on for decades, has utterly failed and has not led to reduced drug use in Canada.After analyzing the recommendation of the Canadian Senate’s 2002 Special Committee on Drugs and the examples of strategies used by some European countries, the Green Party of Canada has come to the conclusion that it is time to legalize the adult use of marijuana. Furthermore, the Greens believe that drug addictions should be treated as a health problem, not as criminal offences.

Green Party MPs will:

Legalize marijuana by removing marijuana from the drug schedule;

Create a regulatory framework for the safe production of marijuana by small, independent growers;

Develop a taxation rate for marijuana similar to that of tobacco;

Establish the sale of marijuana to adults for medicinal or personal use through licensed distribution outlets;

Educate the public about the health threats of marijuana, tobacco, and other drug use;

Launch a public consultation on the decriminalization of illicit drugs, considering the current high costs of the law enforcement effort;

Provide increased funding to safe injection sites, treatment facilities, and addict rehabilitation.

Unfortunately the way the Liberal majority government is doing this is not the way a Green government would have.

On September 8 of this year, Mike Schreiner, leader of the Green Party of Ontario, made the following comment regarding the proposed regulations for marijuana sales:

“This looks like another Liberal plan to say a lot and do very little, supporting big corporations and political insiders over local small businesses.

Mike Schreiner, Green party of Ontario Leader
Mike Schreiner

Having limited retail outlets across Ontario for legal marijuana will do virtually nothing to combat the huge illegal market.

The Green Party does not support the monopolization of marijuana. The marijuana industry should be like the craft brewery industry – helping build local businesses, creating local jobs and contributing tax dollars to local communities across the province.

The GPO supports strict regulations and controls for marijuana sales. The government can license retails outlets with strict rules focused on safety and health for small businesses.

This announcement at this time is a cynical ploy by the Liberals to divert attention from their ongoing legal scandals.”